The 16th Pacific Polymer Conference
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The 16th Pacific Polymer Conference

8-12 Dec 2019, Singapore

Program / Plenary speakers

Plenary speakers

IAS@NTU Lectureship

James L. HEDRICK

IBM Research - Almaden San Jose, California, United States

Thu- 12 Dec 2019
08:30 - 09:15

"Macromolecular Therapeutics: Addressing the Issues Associated with Multidrug Resistance"

James L. HEDRICK

IBM Research - Almaden San Jose, California, United States

James L. Hedrick is a Distinguished Research Staff Member at IBM's Almaden Research Center, but spends a significant amount of time at IBM's Yorktown Heights Research facility, Stanford University as well as the Institute of Bioengineering and Nanotechnology (IBN), Singapore. Jim has pioneered new polymer-forming reactions as high temperature interlayer dielectrics and block copolymers for low dielectric materials and help create the foundation of block copolymer lithography. Jim introduced the polymer community to organic catalysis as an environmentally benign means to living polymerization that provided entry into the nanomedicine field. Jim now leads an effort at IBM in collaboration with IBN to solve critical problems in antimicrobial resistance, gene delivery, sustained therapeutic release and cancer therapies. Jim has over 500 publications, ~400 patents, serves on numerous advisory boards and as won many awards including the IBM Grand Challenge (2017) on Antibiotic Resistance, ACS Herman Mark Senior Scholar award (2017), President Obama’s EPA Green Chemistry award (2012), ACS Polymer Fellow (2010), Carl Marvel award (ACS) on Creative Polymer Chemistry (2003), ACS award on Cooperative Chemistry with Stanford University (2009) and IBM Master Inventor (2018).

"Macromolecular Therapeutics: Addressing the Issues Associated with Multidrug Resistance"

Multi-drug resistant diseases are one of the biggest healthcare challenges society is facing today. The rapid resistance development in microbes, for instance, has completely eviscerated the current antimicrobial drug pipeline. Likewise, resistance onset in cancer renders treatment with a single therapeutic agent completely ineffective, requiring a combination therapy of at least four drugs. To broadly address the multi-faceted problem of drug-resistance as well as other important concerns in disease treatment, we have exploited polymer science to (1) develop novel macromolecular therapeutics for treating infectious disease and cancer, (2) targeted macromolecular delivery agents for poorly soluble drugs and (3) organic macromolecular MRI imaging agents that can be either used alone as a diagnostic or as a concurrent therapeutic delivery agent (theranostics). The foundation of the macromolecular therapeutics is the use of organocatalysis for preparing biocompatible and biodegradable polymers with precisely defined molecular structure to enable the tailoring of macromolecules for specific therapeutic applications.

Organized By:
In Collaboration with:

ppc
ntu
nus
astar