The 16th Pacific Polymer Conference
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The 16th Pacific Polymer Conference

8-12 Dec 2019, Singapore

Program / Plenary speakers

Plenary speakers

Martina STENZEL

University of New South Wales, Australia

Mon- 9 Dec 2019
11:45 - 12:30

"Footballs, Pancakes, Bamboo-sticks – The World of Self-assembled Polymers"

Martina STENZEL

University of New South Wales, Australia

Martina Stenzel studied chemistry at the University of Bayreuth, Germany, before completing her PhD in 1999 at the Institute of Applied Macromolecular Chemistry, University of Stuttgart, Germany. She started as a postdoctoral fellow at UNSW in 1999 and is now a full Professor in the school of chemistry as well as co-director of the Centre for Advanced Macromolecular Design (CAMD).

Her research interest is focused on the synthesis of functional nanoparticles for drug delivery applications. Martina Stenzel published more than 300 peer reviewed papers mainly on polymer and nanoparticle design.

She is scientific editor of Materials Horizons and serves currently on a range of editorial boards. She received a range of awards including the 2011 Le Fèvre Memorial Prize of the Australian Academy of Science. Martina Stenzel is currently chairing the National Chemistry Committee of the Australian Academy of Science and she is also a Fellow of the Academy.

"Footballs, Pancakes, Bamboo-sticks – The World of Self-assembled Polymers"

Material scientists have long turned to nature for inspiration. Many self-assembled systems such as cells are the result of millions of years of evolution and have been optimized over the course. Scientists have aimed at creating similar structures using self-assembled amphiphilic structures such as polymers. Self-assembly of amphiphilic block copolymers in selective solvents is a well-known process and the parameters determining the resulting structures have been studied in detail. Most commonly, micelles are obtained, but also the formation of cylindrical micelles and vesicles is possible. Self-assembly in the presence of additional forces such as crystallization, stacking forces, an additional polymers block or self-assembly in an emulsion system can lead to superimposed structures that lead to nanoobjects beyond traditional micelles.

In this presentation, we will discuss how additional forces can create new nanoparticles that may be suitable for therapeutic purposes. Motivation is to create nanoparticles that can have resemblance of virus-like structures, which are often non-spherical and carry patterned surfaces with bioactive groups.

Morphologies, that resemble viruses, were created using ABC triblock terpolymer. Morphologies ranging from flower-like micelles, cylindrical micelles, raspberry-like morphologies to nano-caterpillars were obtained by adjusting the pH value during the self-assembly process.

Organized By:
In Collaboration with:

ppc
ntu
nus
astar